Football, Mapping, SEC, Sports

Top 5 SEC Football Stadiums

For this blog post I am writing about what I feel are the top five SEC Football Stadiums to go to as a spectator. They are: Alabama’s Bryant-Denny Stadium, LSU’s Tiger Stadium, Florida’s Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, Auburn’s Jordan-Hare Stadium and Texas A&M’s Kyle Field. I have come up with these five because they all have something unique to offer, and include the best range of things that make going to the games so great. These things include: the size of the stadium, the volume of the crowd, and the in-game antics that happen while the game is played. I have created a map on Google to show where these stadiums are located, as well as offering additional information about the stadiums themselves.

Bryant-Denny Stadium is one of the most intimidating places to play for an opposing team, as Alabama holds an outstanding winning percentage there at 80% (212-50-3). Located on the southwestern edge of the University of Alabama campus, the stadium ranks among the nation’s top 5 on-campus football stadiums with a seating capacity of 101,821. This was after it’s latest expansion in the summer of 2010. It is also the SEC’s second largest stadium. The official site of Bryant-Denny Stadium can be seen here: http://www.rolltide.com/facilities/bryant-denny.html

Nicknamed Death Valley, LSU’s Tiger Stadium is one of the most feared places to play for an opposing team. It’s considered to be the SEC’s most electric environment during night time, and it becomes the fifth largest state in Louisiana seven days a year when the Tigers play. Since 1960, LSU is 227-61-4  at night in Tiger Stadium compared to a 26-26-3 record during the day. The crowd noise was so loud one time that the stadium registered on the Richter Scale against Auburn in 1988. http://www.lsusports.net/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=177159

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium is notorious for having three names. The other two are Florida Field and The Swamp. It got the nickname “The Swamp” from then-coach Steve Spurrier in the mid-90’s, who noted that “. . . a swamp is where Gators live. We feel comfortable there, but we hope our opponents feel tentative. A swamp is hot and sticky and can be dangerous. Only Gators get out alive.”  Ben Hill Griffin Stadium is the long-time home of Gator Growl, a student-produced show and pep rally held the Friday night before the annual homecoming football game. http://www.gatorzone.com/facilities/?venue=swamp

Jordan-Hare Stadium has served as the Auburn Tigers home since 1939. The stadium is named for Ralph Jordan, Auburn’s all-time winningest football coach, and Clifford Hare, a longtime chairman of Auburn’s Faculty Athletic Committee. There are a bunch of neat traditions and pregame festivities, including Tiger Walk, where fans get to walk with the football players on their way to the stadium. An eagle is released before the game begins as well, making it’s way to the center of the field where it lands. http://www.auburntigers.com/facilities/jordan_hare_stadium.html

Kyle Field is the Home of the 12th Man. If you’ve ever wondered where that saying originated from, it originated from Texas A&M’s Kyle Field. It is the oldest stadium in the SEC, opening in 1904. Their student section doesn’t get tired, as they stand for the whole game! Kyle Field only became a part of the SEC two years ago and already it has established itself as a top five stadium in the conference. http://www.aggieathletics.com/ViewArticle.dbml?&ATCLID=205237869&DB_OEM_ID=27300

The map itself is to show where these five stadiums are, and included in the descriptions are certain facts about the stadiums themselves. The map also recommends why a person should experience a game in these stadiums, as well as an interesting fact that they might not know about.

Here’s a link to the Google Map. https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zz6Al7PkwYwg.kbXTkg4htG7A

Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s